Why Small and Medium-Sized Non-Profits Must Use Internet

It’s not about joining the virtual bandwagon. With the internet continually evolving everyday, it is simply wise and profitable to maintain web presence, especially for small and medium-sized non-profit organizations.

Internet technology experts and analysts who studied the relationship between internet culture and non-profits conclude that there is indeed a technology gap. Non-profits, especially small and medium-sized ones seem to be “resistant.” A few years back, budget and personnel would have been reasonable justification for not buying into internet technology. These days though, it can be considered a lame excuse.

There is an ever-increasing number of technology providers on the worldwide web that offer much-needed Web 2.0 technologies tailored for small and medium-sized non-profit organizations. The costs of these applications and services are now within a non-profit’s budget. Providers also offer to handle the website and its functions for the non-profit organization that signs up with them.

It’s about time non-profit organizations reconsider the benefits of going online.

Cost Efficiency

Because a non-profit organization’s funds come mostly from donors and sponsors, every cent counts. Although setting up a website and its accompanying functions may initially cost a considerable amount, the long-term benefits more than return the investments. Sending out updates and news through email and electronic newsletters. It’s not about joining the virtual bandwagon. With the internet continually evolving everyday, it is simply wise and profitable to maintain web presence, especially for small and medium-sized non-profit organizations.

Internet technology experts and analysts who studied the relationship between internet culture and non-profits conclude that there is indeed a technology gap. Non-profits, especially small and medium-sized ones seem to be “resistant.” A few years back, budget and personnel would have been reasonable justification for not buying into internet technology. These days though, it can be considered a lame excuse.

There is an ever-increasing number of technology providers on the worldwide web that offer much-needed Web 2.0 technologies tailored for small and medium-sized non-profit organizations. The costs of these applications and services are now within a non-profit’s budget. Providers also offer to handle the website and its functions for the non-profit organization that signs up with them.

It’s about time non-profit organizations reconsider the benefits of going online.

Cost Efficiency

Because a non-profit organization’s funds come mostly from donors and sponsors, every cent counts. Although setting up a website and its accompanying functions may initially cost a considerable amount, the long-term benefits more than return the investments. Sending out updates and news through email and electronic newsletters, particularly to prospective donors saves cash that would have been spent on extra printing cost and postage.

Time Efficiency

Constituents and donors appreciate getting information on time. Logging on to a non-profit organization’s website takes only a few seconds compared to time spent in calling the non-profit’s office or waiting for the quarterly hardcopy newsletter and financial information.
Having an online database of beneficiaries and donors makes for quicker file retrieval, immediate profile updates, as well as on-time status reports. Non-profit volunteers can more efficiently and more quickly connect resources with needs.

More Global Audience

Through the internet, small and medium-sized non-profit organizations have access to a wider audience, can reach more prospective donors, and gain more global visibility. Supporters can come from just about any patch of the globe-from Africa to Asia-virtually holding hands space and time for a common good.

More Community Participation

When a non-profit organization makes use of social media (Facebook, Tweeter, MySpace, etc.) to promote its causes or events, more people are engaged. Community participation and support radically increases. Volunteers, beneficiaries and other constituents have a common cyber lounge where they can exchange ideas. They are not just names in a list or database, they are once more real people who not only contribute financial assistance but give their very selves.

More Funds Coming In

Where more people participate and engage, the possibility of more funds coming in is not far behind. When people are informed, listened to, and given value through a non-profit organization’s website that they can access any time, they are more than willing to give. They also become evangelists for the non-profit’s causes and projects. And the cycle of support and friendship goes on.